Oldest ‘shrine’ discovery suggests Buddha lived in C6 BC


KATHMANDU
Archaeologists have unearthed the earliest ever ‘Buddhist shrine’ at Buddha’s birthplace in Nepal, which suggests the sage may have lived in the 6th century BC, two centuries earlier than thought.

Excavations within the sacred Maya Devi Temple at Lumbini in Nepal, a UNESCO World Heritage site long identified as the birthplace of the Buddha, uncovered the remains of a previously unknown sixth-century BC timber structure under a series of brick temples.

This is the first archaeological material linking the life of the Buddha – and thus the first flowering of Buddhism – to a specific century, according to the research co-led by Robin Coningham from Durham University, UK.

The timber structure contains an open space in the centre that links to the nativity story of the Buddha himself – his mother Queen Maya Devi gave birth to him while holding on to a tree branch within the Lumbini Garden.

Full report here Deccan Chronicle

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